~ the old & rustic kitchen ~

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Can’t operate without my dusty black-board in the kitchen, an utterly indispensable item for lists & reminders, the ongoing ‘To Do’ list, grocery list, phone numbers & other ramblings.

Sometimes it’s home to other notes and ephemera. Sometimes, if there’s room, I doodle.

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Who can do without the basic necessities of life like these old kitchen needfuls?

Hanging from the top of the board is an assortment of needed essentials, vintage kitchen tools & utensils like soup ladles, strainers, forks, spoons, scoops, graters, colanders, mashers . . . .  copper, brass, tin, enamel ware, wire, wood . . . .  I like the darker hues brought about by natural patina, wear & tear.

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Some ingenuity has gone into the old wire forks. I love the detail. Dad used to make our toast using an old wire fork much like these. He  would place the bread on the fork then hold it over the coals in the old wood stove in the kitchen.

Once, back in the ‘olden days’, people had to carve out a way of life from whatever was around. To ‘make do’ was the norm. Once a necessity, these old wire pieces are an important part of my collection of utilitarian objects not much used. Other pieces I do use on & off.

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Ephemera on the board.

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The old tobacco cloth curtains, next to a pair of blue butchers aprons, are in the north window of the kitchen.

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Wood handle for a tin spoon. Brass soup ladle. Chippy rustic enamel ware.

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The measurements bottom left are my notes for the windmill project. The windmill’s 4 legs/feet form the 1900 cm square base (almost 2 metres). I’m looking at 4 x 300 wide holes at 900 deep.

I’ve had the large old windmill for a few years now & getting impatient for it to be up. This is it (two images below) lying down in the front paddock. Nice & rusty & rustic. No parts missing including the mill and tail. I’m working on the windmill project now talking to the guys who are going to erect it down from the house.

 

Image may contain: sky, tree, outdoor and nature

Image may contain: plant, tree, grass, sky, outdoor and nature

Windmill & water tank, Australia. From The Serenity Space blog.

That’s why I’m also on the hunt for an old corrugated iron tank, preferably with rust, to sit next to the windmill possibly on a stand of some sort & to complete the feature much like in the two images above.

Rust holes & other dings & dents in the tank wont matter as it’s not for water storage & simply to complete the vignette.

Not too many years ago, & say up until the 1960s, a galvanised tank or two was invariably found at Australian rural homes & farmhouses, usually above ground on some sort of tank stand.  They were fed water via the windmill pump or by roof guttering.

Yes, I’m looking forward to this beautiful piece of cast iron & tin up & standing like it used to be.

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