Foxed and Ghosted Mirror

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Love these old mirrors when ghosted or foxed like this showing a silver loss patina. The process is often regarded as ghosted or ghosting in Australia.

 

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The silvered background has suffered age related deterioration making it come away from the glass for the very shabby and distressed finish. The mirror is not really reflective, now, in a practical sense. But oh how I love it!

 

 

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And the ornate shabby wood frame tops it off with its etched carving and spindles covered in layers of aged, chippy paint in pale green, blue and a sort of drab pale pink.

 

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Something about ghosting/foxing that adds a layer of interest and depth to what would be a fairly ordinary old dressing table mirror. This style of mirror was quite pedestrian, common in Australian homes via the ubiquitous Victorian/Edwardian colonial style dressing table or chest of drawers.  Starting in colonial days most homes had at least one and many still do.

 

 

 

These examples show dressing tables/chest of drawers with the removeable mirrors in place. While it’s not hard to find the mirrors removed from the vanity/chest base, it’s harder to find them with this kind of shabby and distressed finish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know this mirror would be quite impractical to some, no longer serving its original function, but not to me.  Its ‘as is‘ rustic beauty, practical or not, is just fine thanks.

 

 

Of course, you can do your own ghosting/foxing these days. Yes, you can deliberately distress a new mirror to get the look of age and deterioration as there are various tutorials floating around out there in Google-land

 

You can also buy new mirrors in all shapes and sizes, from huge and ornate to not so huge and ornate, with ready made foxing. A short browse on the internet and you will see what I mean.

 

 

 

I am enchanted by mirrors with this type of patina, the mix of rough and fading glamour.  Like this little one some are so faded and lost the silvering paint that you can see the wall and wire behind them through the glass. Love them more then!

 

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