Puppetry: ‘The Trial’ or The Woeful Story of Joseph K. or Man’s Inhumanity to Man by Marionettes

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What is this you ask? Plain old puppet theatre is what it is.  Marionettes doing serious stuff.

How tricky can that be?

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Review from Montreal Gazette

Finally, just room to mention another representation of man’s inhumanity to man, again involving puppetry. Kafka’s Le procès (The Trial), as presented by Slovenia’s Théâtre de Marionnettes de Maribor, takes place inside an intimate and threatening theatre machine. Two puppeteer-performers, dressed in the long leather coats favoured by East European secret policemen, freely adapt Kafka’s judicial nightmare using finger puppets, items of clothing and an all-purpose cabinet. It’s enthralling, visually stunning and unforgettably eccentric.

 

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From Puppet Theatre Maribor:

In this timeless composition of music and puppets, the audience find themselves in the role of Josef K. The play mercilessly places the audience in hopeless situations, acquaints them with the inner workings of a societal machine and also with the intimate world of some of the people nearest and dearest to Joseph K. The audience is placed in the centre of happenings, where they must responsibly submit themselves to the tender mercy of the Trial. Different theatrical techniques are lined up both among the audience and around them: the black humour of hand puppets, the poetry of object-related theatre, and cabaret improvisation. Two actors, musicians and puppeteers run the machine system. Gentle puppet scenes alternate with strong rhythmic effects that occasionally erupt into a concert.

 

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T structure of the system, situation of the individual, values and valuation, fate, hopelessness, humour; staging concept, literary source material, stage equipment, innovative execution.

 

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(Partially base on motifs from the novel The Trial by Franz Kafka)

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